On Fire – Available Now

I honestly can’t remember the last Cleis anthology I was a part of. I think it may have been Love, Lust and Zombies, edited by Mitzi Szereto (my story in this is easily my favourite, by the way, so check it out.)

Today marks the release of the latest, this time from the desk of Rachel Kramer Bussel. On Fire features my story A Place As Beautiful As This as well as a roster that includes some of my favourite authors — Giselle Renarde, Tamsin Flowers, Jade A. Waters and Victoria Blisse to name a few. If you’re a fan of erotic romance, add this to your TBR.

Rachel has all the links posted at the book’s Tumblr. If you’re on Netgalley, you can request it there in exchange for an impartial review.

You can also check out my other stories by heading over to I Write Smutty Things, where you can find links to free reads at Tablo and also to my Amazon page. I’ve been in a lot of great anthologies put together by some fabulous editors, and many of those stories are now up at Tablo to read for free.

Hit the brakes

It’s been a while since I posted, mainly because I’ve been busting my guts working on the anticipated release of Shadows May Fall. It’ll be two years this month since I first started writing it, so needless to say I’m ready to be done with it once and for all. I learned how to successfully put a print book together, a first for me, and just yesterday I was sitting down with my red pen in hand making what I expected to be the final corrections.

Then, I got a voice message on my phone. It was from a publisher I had submitted to back in April. I sent them a query just as I was straddling the fence about self-publishing and they were the only traditional publisher I directly submitted to (I did the agent thing for about a minute in early days) and when the summer came along I proceeded with getting things together to get this book ready for publication, including posting it on Wattpad and learning how to make a dead tree book. I even switched up the pen name — originally I had a brand new one, but when I decided to go indie I made the decision to use one I had previously published romances under.

Needless to say, after ten months, I was pretty surprised to get the call. I thought about it for the afternoon and decided I would send them the full manuscript.

A bit of irony here: my decision to go with this publisher or go indie was prompted by a session I attended on traditional publishing vs self publishing in which the editor I submitted to was one of the panelists for trad publishing (the other was one of their own authors who also self-published.)

So, just over a month before my planned publication date, I’m hitting the brakes. Barring the publisher giving an auto-no after I told them it was currently on Wattpad (though having an established readership might actually help from a business perspective,) the publication date is suspended indefinitely.

What this means:

a) They’ll offer a contract, and publication will be at least a year from the date of signing.

b) They won’t offer a contract, and the publication date will most likely be next winter (depending on how long it takes them to read and whether I have to nudge.)

I could have said it wasn’t available and proceeded to go indy, but they’re a great publisher (my Christmas stocking was filled with three of their books this year), they have a YA imprint, and they publish the sort of thing I write. I had planned to submit something else to them down the road, but I assumed that Shadows May Fall and its subsequent books were all no-go.

Normally this is something I would keep under my hat, but I’ve had some readers ask specifically about a print edition and I had promised 2017, so I figured it would only be fair to be upfront.

I’ll be sitting at the computer all weekend trying to put together the manuscript. It’s been AGES since I had to whip something up for submission. Then I have to scour everywhere for mentions of a publication date.

After that, I wait, and I get to work on something new — because that, my friends, is the whirlwind that is publishing.

2016 Reading Roundup

This is the first year in a while I was able to sit back and do some reading. Previously I had been so busy writing and making deadlines, not to mention living in an apartment where peace and quiet simply was not possible, but this year I actually managed to get 15 books read. Well, 14 so far. I’m on number 15 right now.

That’s not really a big number when you consider in past years I read through about a hundred a year, but it’s a huge start, and I think some of these books deserve a good shout-out.

The Little Beach Street Bakery by Jenny Colgan – I actually enjoyed the sequel much more (and am eagerly awaiting the Christmas book), but this is the book that kicked off my return to reading back in February. City girl’s relationship and business tanks, and she heads off to Cornwall to get her bearings together. She doesn’t plan on staying, but after her hobby of baking bread turns into a career she decides to put down roots. There’s a a hunky fisherman, a hunky bee-keeper, a curmudgeonly bakery owner, and a baby puffin in this one. A BABY PUFFIN.

The Rosie Project by Graeme Simsion – This one has been out for a while but I’d been avoiding it, and it was on my Kindle longer than it should have. It’s about a scientist with Asperger’s syndrome looking for a wife in a very scientific way. You’d think he was being thrown into a cutesy scenario where Rosie is the wild, unpredictable love interest that brings him out of his comfort zone, but Rosie is pretty average as love interests go. Definitely one of my favourites, and I’m keen to get started on the sequel.

Mattie’s Story by Margaret A. Westlie – Another one that sat on my TBR for too long. This authors is local to me, from Prince Edward Island, and her book was right up my alley. At fifteen, Mattie’s father dies and she’s married off by her mother to a schoolteacher, David. It’s a coming of age story set in the 1800s and you follow Mattie from her tomboyish adolescence into marriage and then motherhood.

Hyde by Daniel Levine – Finally a Jekyll and Hyde adaptation that didn’t make me want to rip my hair out while reading. Told entirely from the perspective of Edward Hyde, we learn that he’s not the villain that the original book made him out to be, and we learn why he exists to begin with. There’s a twist, and even if you see it coming you’ll still be on the edge of your seat by the end.

The Secret Path by Jeff Lemire – This graphic novel is heartbreaking and based on a true story. A part of The Secret Path project that includes an album from Gord Downie, a concert series, and a television special, The Secret Path gives a name to the sixties scoop in which native children in Canada were placed in residential schools to assimilate them into white Canadian culture.

My TBR for 2017 has over 75 books on it (!!!) – the accumulation of about 2 years worth of book buying, so my goal is to read every single one of them at 2 a week, and with one exception I’m pretty much cut off from buying any more books until I get every single one of them read.