Tourist

Just coming off vacation, and if you’re not following me on Twitter or Instagram, here’s a little bit of what I got to see when I was off. I didn’t go far (I never do when on vacation) but I managed to knock a few Must See and Must Do things off my list.

First up was my annual June cottage stay on Prince Edward Island. I booked right in Cavendish this time and I only moved my car once the entire time I was there. If I wanted to buy something, I walked (it helped that I was a 2 minute walk to stores.) If I wanted to see something, I walked. Green Gables was a bit of a distance in the hot sun, and I have the burn to prove it, but I made it there after they’d closed up and all was quiet so I could take a bit of a walk on the grounds.

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It was a nice little getaway, and I broke my no-writing-on-vacation rule to get over a hump on one thing and also start something new.

Back in Nova Scotia, I had a couple of things I needed to see before the end of the week or else I’d never get off my ass and do it. First was the Collision in the Narrows exhibit at the Maritime Museum of the Atlantic. I’m not one for crowds at all, but I wanted to get a look at the 100th anniversary memorial quilt.  Totally worth the aggravation. Absolutely amazing job.

 

Another thing on the list — a WWI trench, which was set up inside a fortress. Talk about claustrophobic. Trying to squish by the other tourists, I couldn’t even imagine people living in there while on the front lines, or sleeping on hard chicken wire in a building that might collapse on your head? Eep.

 

I kept on breaking my no-writing rule and have a little something done. Well, a lot something, if you count what I did to my writing space. This room was initially supposed to be a laundry room, but after I changed my mind on the location I decided to make it into a computer room, and the computer room needed a fresh coat of paint.

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The old colour was the same shade as a grey sky. This new colour is … well, just look at it. I had a minor panic when the hardware store guy popped the top and showed me the colour, but once I got it on the walls I was madly in love. It looks amazing. Having previously written wherever I could get peace and quiet, this is an excellent spot. I’ve got some wallpaper on the way for a wall that’s just not salvageable, a poster, and some neat little bookends. Definitely looking forward to the finished product.

 

Detours 2016

I can be a little manic about the health of my car. If it so much as sneezes, I’m thrown into a panic. Whereas I’d have to be near death’s door to actually drag myself to the doctor, I fuss over my little Kia and will drop everything to make sure it’s in near-perfect health. My car takes me to work, to play, to holiday, but most importantly it takes me off the main arteries to unassuming little places I find myself obsessed with finding.

This year, the theme was trains stations. It stemmed from the sequel to Shadows May Fall, Pretty Boy, opening in a train station in the early 1920s. All totaled, I visited five former train stations in rural communities, and at the end of the day they make up the fictional Port Croft train station where Charlie Gaston first spies the girl of his dreams.

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Antigonish (top), Tatamagouche (left), Pugwash (right), all Nova Scotia.

The Antigonish station is currently the Antigonish Heritage Museum, which is more beautiful inside than it is out. The Tatamagouche station is currently an inn, and I stayed in one of the cabooses for the night and ate in the dining car — highly recommended for both — and it was here I was really able to get a feel for what it might have been like waiting for the last train on a rainy summer evening. The Pugwash station, now a library, had a busier feel to it, like it was the heart of the town, and was the only station I visited where the tracks hadn’t been turned into a trail — these tracks went right to the salt mine on the opposite side of the Pugwash Basin.

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Elmira, Prince Edward Island

The Elmira station in Prince Edward Island was the only museum dedicated to the rail service, which was a little comforting to know that I’m not the only dork who drives an hour to the middle of nowhere to look at a train station. Their display was so massive I found myself taking pictures of it all so I could read it all at a later date, and it was really easy to just stand there and picture it as a working station. The “ladies waiting room” gave me a bit of a chuckle — I kept thinking of the station master in Anne of Green Gables asking Anne if she’s rather wait there, setting her off on a tangent about

I found my last station purely by accident — driving to PEI, I passed the visitor information centre in Cape Tormentine, where the ferry had been located before the Confederation Bridge was built, and I just thought to myself that the place looked like it might have been a train station at one point. I googled it once I was settled into my motel, and on my way back I stopped for a good look.

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Cape Tormentine, New Brunswick

 

Though quiet now, Cape Tormentine struck me as the sort of place that had been busy most of the day back when the ferry and the station had been there. I’d like to have a look at this place when it’s open, but the day was gorgeous and just walking around by myself was still a pretty good experience. The trail went right to where the old ferry had been, which had a pretty serene view of the Confederation Bridge (ferry-goers have to cross over in Caribou, Nova Scotia these days.)

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Confederation Bridge from Cape Tormentine.

Overall, it was an interesting trip, but it wasn’t just about seeing with my own eyes the places that make up the next book. With Shadows May Fall, it was hit and miss on that front — I couldn’t see places that just weren’t there anymore, and it’s hard to tell if Halifax has retained any of the atmosphere it had in the early part of the 19th Century (though, aside from the reluctance to change with the times vs the desperation to stay relevant, I have a feeling that at least the attitude is the same) so I relied heavily on old photos and descriptions from those alive during that time. For Pretty Boy, the location isn’t real but is an amalgamation of smaller towns. I can pick and choose what I want and what I need, but at the same time you have to be aware of the social history that structures like old train stations bring with them – jobs, migration, local resources, prejudices, politics, and so on, even if I never mention these things in the books.